Operation Bird’s Eye

Operation Bird’s Eye is a photographic collection of nearly 400 overlapping aerial images which form a continuous strip spanning the United States from coast to coast. Beginning in Ventura, California and ending over Long Island, New York, these nine by nine inch prints capture a sliver of the American landscape as it looked in 1948. The images were captured during one continuous flight, and when joined together the physical prints stretch 192 feet, showing a slice of land 2,700 miles long.

The flight from which these images were captured took off from the Air Force Flight Test Center (now Edwards Air Force Base) in Muroc, California at 7:40 AM local time on September 1, 1948, first gaining altitude out over the Pacific Ocean before turning east. The plane was a Republic XR-12, an experimental aircraft of which only two were ever built. It was outfitted with K-17 cameras able to shoot a continuous roll of film up to 200 frames. The camera shot at 50 second intervals throughout the duration of the flight, at a constant altitude of 40,000 feet, resulting in a field of vision of around 130 square miles.

The purpose of the XR-12 was photo reconnaissance, and Operation Bird’s Eye was meant as a demonstration of its capabilities. The plane, able to fly high and fast enough to avoid conventional enemy aircraft and fighters, was essentially a flying photography laboratory, with the crew able to process film mid-flight. The Operation Bird’s Eye flight broke records as it crossed the continent, capturing the longest span of aerial photos ever accumulated in a single trip to that point. After 6 hours and 55 minutes, the crew landed at Mitchel Field in Garden City, New York on Long Island.

Click below to read more and check out the images!

operationbirdseye

GIS Coordinator Position

The City of San Jacinto has a temporary part time opening for a GIS Coordinator.

Under limited supervision from the Manager of Information Services, the GIS Coordinator develops, organizes, manages, designs, and maintains the City’s Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Provides advanced training and technical support to end users regarding GIS and related hardware and software operations; performs related duties, as required.

For more information and to apply, click here.

ArcGIS User Seminar

The ArcGIS User Seminar is a free event that is designed to inspire and guide you to getting the most from your organization’s investment in ArcGIS products. Join ESRI for a full-day seminar with an afternoon workshop. Space is limited in the workshop. ESRI experts will teach users how to become more successful in their work by sharing solutions, reviewing new capabilities, discussing best practices, and building community.

An ArcGIS User Seminar will be offered on February 21 in Glendale.  For more information and to register, click here.

GeoInquiries

Teachers of a variety of subjects and grade levels who would like to incorporate maps into their classroom activities may want to check out ESRI’s GeoInquiries, a collection of short, standards-based inquiry activities for teaching map-based content found in commonly used textbooks. You will find a library of activities organized by topic, with each topic containing 15-20 different activities. Each GeoInquiry activity includes a teachers’ guide in PDF format, an interactive webmap, and an optional worksheet for students. Most activities are Level 1, which are “activities that teach standards-based content without a login to or installation of ArcGIS Online.” Some topics also offer Level 2 activities that use ArcGIS Online analysis tools. Those new to using GeoInquiries should be sure to read through the guide Getting to Know GeoInquiries, which is linked in the introductory paragraph on the collection’s main page. Check it out!

geoinquiries

Atlas of US Historical Geography

Over eighty years after it was originally published, Charles O. Paullin’s Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States remains one of the most impressive and most useful atlases of American history. Containing nearly 700 individual maps spread across 166 plates, it addresses a broad range of issues. Beginning with a chapter consisting of 33 maps on the natural environment and a second containing 47 maps documenting the evolution of European and later American cartographic knowledge about North America, the atlas mapped an exhaustive number of historical topics: exploration and settlement of the continent, the location of colleges and churches, disputes over international and state boundaries, voting in presidential elections and in Congress, reforms from women’s suffrage to workmen’s compensation, transportation, industries, agriculture, commerce, the distribution of wealth, and military history.  Continue reading

Today: Implementing Open Geography Education Webinar

Open Education Global (OEG), an international network for open education, recently announced Adam Dastrup, Professor of Geosciences at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC), won OEG’s prestigious Open Geography award. In 2014, Adam Dastrup started the Open Geography Education initiative as a way to provide educators with OER textbooks to students. The philosophy of the initiative is to provide open resources, products and services to anybody interested in learning about the earth, its places and the relationships between people and their environments.

In this webinar you will:

  • Learn How the initiative began
  • See Examples of Textbooks
  • Explore implementation

The webinar will be today, Wednesday, January 15th, 2020 11:00 AM- 12:00 PM PST.  Click here to register for the webinar.